Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing

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Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing. / McCartney, Robert; Boustedt, Jonas; Eckerdal, Anna; Sanders, Kate; Thomas, Lynda; Moström, Jan Erik; Zander, Carol.

In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, Vol. 16, No. 1, 2, 26.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

McCartney, R, Boustedt, J, Eckerdal, A, Sanders, K, Thomas, L, Moström, JE & Zander, C 2016, 'Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing' ACM Transactions on Computing Education, vol. 16, no. 1, 2. https://doi.org/10.1145/2747008

APA

McCartney, R., Boustedt, J., Eckerdal, A., Sanders, K., Thomas, L., Moström, J. E., & Zander, C. (2016). Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 16(1), [2]. https://doi.org/10.1145/2747008

Vancouver

McCartney R, Boustedt J, Eckerdal A, Sanders K, Thomas L, Moström JE et al. Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing. ACM Transactions on Computing Education. 2016 Feb 26;16(1). 2. https://doi.org/10.1145/2747008

Author

McCartney, Robert ; Boustedt, Jonas ; Eckerdal, Anna ; Sanders, Kate ; Thomas, Lynda ; Moström, Jan Erik ; Zander, Carol. / Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing. In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 1.

Bibtex - Download

@article{a75da653aba94adfba1f9305f3d33daf,
title = "Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing",
abstract = "In this article, we address the question of why computing students choose to learn computing topics on their own. A better understanding of why some students choose to learn on their own may help us to motivate other students to develop this important skill. In addition, it may help in curriculum design; if we need to leave some topics out of our expanding curriculum, a good choice might be those topics that students readily learn on their own.Based on a thematic analysis of 17 semistructured interviews, we found that computing students’ motivations for self-directed learning fall into four general themes: projects, social and peer interactions, joy of learning, and fear. Under these, we describe several more specific subthemes, illustrated in the words of the students.The project-related and social motivations are quite prominent. Although these motivations appear in the literature, they received greater emphasis from our interviewees. Perhaps most characteristic of computing is the motivation to learn to complete some project, both projects done for fun and projects required for school or work.",
keywords = "motivation, informal learning, self-directed learning",
author = "Robert McCartney and Jonas Boustedt and Anna Eckerdal and Kate Sanders and Lynda Thomas and Mostr{\"o}m, {Jan Erik} and Carol Zander",
note = "This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) via http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2747008",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1145/2747008",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
journal = "ACM Transactions on Computing Education",
issn = "1531-4278",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why computing students learn on their own: motivation for self-directed learning of computing

AU - McCartney, Robert

AU - Boustedt, Jonas

AU - Eckerdal, Anna

AU - Sanders, Kate

AU - Thomas, Lynda

AU - Moström, Jan Erik

AU - Zander, Carol

N1 - This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) via http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2747008

PY - 2016/2/26

Y1 - 2016/2/26

N2 - In this article, we address the question of why computing students choose to learn computing topics on their own. A better understanding of why some students choose to learn on their own may help us to motivate other students to develop this important skill. In addition, it may help in curriculum design; if we need to leave some topics out of our expanding curriculum, a good choice might be those topics that students readily learn on their own.Based on a thematic analysis of 17 semistructured interviews, we found that computing students’ motivations for self-directed learning fall into four general themes: projects, social and peer interactions, joy of learning, and fear. Under these, we describe several more specific subthemes, illustrated in the words of the students.The project-related and social motivations are quite prominent. Although these motivations appear in the literature, they received greater emphasis from our interviewees. Perhaps most characteristic of computing is the motivation to learn to complete some project, both projects done for fun and projects required for school or work.

AB - In this article, we address the question of why computing students choose to learn computing topics on their own. A better understanding of why some students choose to learn on their own may help us to motivate other students to develop this important skill. In addition, it may help in curriculum design; if we need to leave some topics out of our expanding curriculum, a good choice might be those topics that students readily learn on their own.Based on a thematic analysis of 17 semistructured interviews, we found that computing students’ motivations for self-directed learning fall into four general themes: projects, social and peer interactions, joy of learning, and fear. Under these, we describe several more specific subthemes, illustrated in the words of the students.The project-related and social motivations are quite prominent. Although these motivations appear in the literature, they received greater emphasis from our interviewees. Perhaps most characteristic of computing is the motivation to learn to complete some project, both projects done for fun and projects required for school or work.

KW - motivation

KW - informal learning

KW - self-directed learning

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/2160/42895

U2 - 10.1145/2747008

DO - 10.1145/2747008

M3 - Article

VL - 16

JO - ACM Transactions on Computing Education

JF - ACM Transactions on Computing Education

SN - 1531-4278

IS - 1

M1 - 2

ER -

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