The equine gastrointestinal microbiomeImpacts of weight-loss

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The equine gastrointestinal microbiome : Impacts of weight-loss. / Morrison, Philippa K.; Newbold, Charles J.; Jones, Eleanor; Worgan, Hilary J.; Grove-White, Dai H.; Dugdale, Alexandra H.; Barfoot, Clare; Harris, Patricia A.; Argo, Caroline McGregor.

In: BMC Veterinary Research, Vol. 16, No. 1, 78, 04.03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Morrison, PK, Newbold, CJ, Jones, E, Worgan, HJ, Grove-White, DH, Dugdale, AH, Barfoot, C, Harris, PA & Argo, CM 2020, 'The equine gastrointestinal microbiome: Impacts of weight-loss', BMC Veterinary Research, vol. 16, no. 1, 78. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-020-02295-6

APA

Morrison, P. K., Newbold, C. J., Jones, E., Worgan, H. J., Grove-White, D. H., Dugdale, A. H., Barfoot, C., Harris, P. A., & Argo, C. M. (2020). The equine gastrointestinal microbiome: Impacts of weight-loss. BMC Veterinary Research, 16(1), [78]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-020-02295-6

Vancouver

Morrison PK, Newbold CJ, Jones E, Worgan HJ, Grove-White DH, Dugdale AH et al. The equine gastrointestinal microbiome: Impacts of weight-loss. BMC Veterinary Research. 2020 Mar 4;16(1). 78. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-020-02295-6

Author

Morrison, Philippa K. ; Newbold, Charles J. ; Jones, Eleanor ; Worgan, Hilary J. ; Grove-White, Dai H. ; Dugdale, Alexandra H. ; Barfoot, Clare ; Harris, Patricia A. ; Argo, Caroline McGregor. / The equine gastrointestinal microbiome : Impacts of weight-loss. In: BMC Veterinary Research. 2020 ; Vol. 16, No. 1.

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@article{09a597ebd0fc4b2394f157f0c22ff26d,
title = "The equine gastrointestinal microbiome: Impacts of weight-loss",
abstract = "Abstract: Background: Obesity is an important equine welfare issue. Whilst dietary restriction is the most effective weight-loss tool, individual animals range in their weight-loss propensity. Gastrointestinal-derived bacteria play a fundamental role in host-health and have been associated with obesity and weight-loss in other species. This study evaluated the faecal microbiome (next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA genes) of 15 obese Welsh Mountain pony mares, in the same 11-week period across 2 years (n = 8 Year 1; n = 7 Year 2). Following a 4-week acclimation period (pre-diet phase) during which time individuals were fed the same hay to maintenance (2% body mass (BM) as daily dry matter (DM) intake), animals underwent a 7-week period of dietary restriction (1% BM hay as daily DM intake). Faeces were sampled on the final 3 days of the pre-diet phase and the final 3 days of the dietary restriction phase. Bacterial communities were determined using Next Generation Sequencing of amplified V1-V2 hypervariable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA. Results: Losses in body mass ranged from 7.11 to 11.59%. Changes in the faecal microbiome composition following weight-loss included a reduction in the relative abundance of Firmicutes and Tenericutes and a reduction in indices of bacterial diversity. Pre-diet diversity was negatively associated with weight-loss. Pre-diet faecal acetate concentration was a strong predictor of subsequent weight-loss and negatively associated with Sphaerochaeta (Spirochaetes phylum) abundance. When animals were divided into 3 groups (high, mid, low) based overall weight loss, pre-diet bacterial community structure was found to have the greatest divergence between the high and low weight-loss groups (R = 0.67, p <0.01), following PERMANOVA and ANOSIM analysis. Conclusions: Weight-loss in this group of ponies was associated with lower pre-diet faecal bacterial diversity and greater pre-diet acetate concentration. Overall, these data support a role for the faecal microbiome in weight-loss propensity in ponies and provide a baseline for research evaluating elements of the faecal microbiome in predicting weight-loss success in larger cohorts.",
keywords = "Research Article, Gastroenterology and nutrition, Equine, equine obesity, Weight-loss, Insulin dysregulation, Faecal microbiome, Apparent digestibility, Volatile fatty acid, Biomarkers",
author = "Morrison, {Philippa K.} and Newbold, {Charles J.} and Eleanor Jones and Worgan, {Hilary J.} and Grove-White, {Dai H.} and Dugdale, {Alexandra H.} and Clare Barfoot and Harris, {Patricia A.} and Argo, {Caroline McGregor}",
note = "Acknowledgements The authors wish to register their gratitude to the local horse owning community for their support of this work by loaning their animals for study. Thanks go to the staff of Ness Heath Farm and the {\textquoteleft}Pony Girls{\textquoteright} for their unstinting efforts on our behalf. Funding The study was funded by WALTHAM. With the exception of PH, the funder had no role in study design, sample collection, data analyses, interpretation of data or in writing the manuscript.",
year = "2020",
month = mar,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1186/s12917-020-02295-6",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
journal = "BMC Veterinary Research",
issn = "1746-6148",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The equine gastrointestinal microbiome

T2 - Impacts of weight-loss

AU - Morrison, Philippa K.

AU - Newbold, Charles J.

AU - Jones, Eleanor

AU - Worgan, Hilary J.

AU - Grove-White, Dai H.

AU - Dugdale, Alexandra H.

AU - Barfoot, Clare

AU - Harris, Patricia A.

AU - Argo, Caroline McGregor

N1 - Acknowledgements The authors wish to register their gratitude to the local horse owning community for their support of this work by loaning their animals for study. Thanks go to the staff of Ness Heath Farm and the ‘Pony Girls’ for their unstinting efforts on our behalf. Funding The study was funded by WALTHAM. With the exception of PH, the funder had no role in study design, sample collection, data analyses, interpretation of data or in writing the manuscript.

PY - 2020/3/4

Y1 - 2020/3/4

N2 - Abstract: Background: Obesity is an important equine welfare issue. Whilst dietary restriction is the most effective weight-loss tool, individual animals range in their weight-loss propensity. Gastrointestinal-derived bacteria play a fundamental role in host-health and have been associated with obesity and weight-loss in other species. This study evaluated the faecal microbiome (next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA genes) of 15 obese Welsh Mountain pony mares, in the same 11-week period across 2 years (n = 8 Year 1; n = 7 Year 2). Following a 4-week acclimation period (pre-diet phase) during which time individuals were fed the same hay to maintenance (2% body mass (BM) as daily dry matter (DM) intake), animals underwent a 7-week period of dietary restriction (1% BM hay as daily DM intake). Faeces were sampled on the final 3 days of the pre-diet phase and the final 3 days of the dietary restriction phase. Bacterial communities were determined using Next Generation Sequencing of amplified V1-V2 hypervariable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA. Results: Losses in body mass ranged from 7.11 to 11.59%. Changes in the faecal microbiome composition following weight-loss included a reduction in the relative abundance of Firmicutes and Tenericutes and a reduction in indices of bacterial diversity. Pre-diet diversity was negatively associated with weight-loss. Pre-diet faecal acetate concentration was a strong predictor of subsequent weight-loss and negatively associated with Sphaerochaeta (Spirochaetes phylum) abundance. When animals were divided into 3 groups (high, mid, low) based overall weight loss, pre-diet bacterial community structure was found to have the greatest divergence between the high and low weight-loss groups (R = 0.67, p <0.01), following PERMANOVA and ANOSIM analysis. Conclusions: Weight-loss in this group of ponies was associated with lower pre-diet faecal bacterial diversity and greater pre-diet acetate concentration. Overall, these data support a role for the faecal microbiome in weight-loss propensity in ponies and provide a baseline for research evaluating elements of the faecal microbiome in predicting weight-loss success in larger cohorts.

AB - Abstract: Background: Obesity is an important equine welfare issue. Whilst dietary restriction is the most effective weight-loss tool, individual animals range in their weight-loss propensity. Gastrointestinal-derived bacteria play a fundamental role in host-health and have been associated with obesity and weight-loss in other species. This study evaluated the faecal microbiome (next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA genes) of 15 obese Welsh Mountain pony mares, in the same 11-week period across 2 years (n = 8 Year 1; n = 7 Year 2). Following a 4-week acclimation period (pre-diet phase) during which time individuals were fed the same hay to maintenance (2% body mass (BM) as daily dry matter (DM) intake), animals underwent a 7-week period of dietary restriction (1% BM hay as daily DM intake). Faeces were sampled on the final 3 days of the pre-diet phase and the final 3 days of the dietary restriction phase. Bacterial communities were determined using Next Generation Sequencing of amplified V1-V2 hypervariable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA. Results: Losses in body mass ranged from 7.11 to 11.59%. Changes in the faecal microbiome composition following weight-loss included a reduction in the relative abundance of Firmicutes and Tenericutes and a reduction in indices of bacterial diversity. Pre-diet diversity was negatively associated with weight-loss. Pre-diet faecal acetate concentration was a strong predictor of subsequent weight-loss and negatively associated with Sphaerochaeta (Spirochaetes phylum) abundance. When animals were divided into 3 groups (high, mid, low) based overall weight loss, pre-diet bacterial community structure was found to have the greatest divergence between the high and low weight-loss groups (R = 0.67, p <0.01), following PERMANOVA and ANOSIM analysis. Conclusions: Weight-loss in this group of ponies was associated with lower pre-diet faecal bacterial diversity and greater pre-diet acetate concentration. Overall, these data support a role for the faecal microbiome in weight-loss propensity in ponies and provide a baseline for research evaluating elements of the faecal microbiome in predicting weight-loss success in larger cohorts.

KW - Research Article

KW - Gastroenterology and nutrition

KW - Equine, equine obesity

KW - Weight-loss

KW - Insulin dysregulation

KW - Faecal microbiome

KW - Apparent digestibility

KW - Volatile fatty acid

KW - Biomarkers

U2 - 10.1186/s12917-020-02295-6

DO - 10.1186/s12917-020-02295-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 32131835

VL - 16

JO - BMC Veterinary Research

JF - BMC Veterinary Research

SN - 1746-6148

IS - 1

M1 - 78

ER -

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