Spatial Ecology of Mangrove ForestsA Remote Sensing Perspective

Authors Organisations
  • Richard Lucas(Author)
    University of New South Wales
  • Alma Vázquez Lule(Author)
    University of Delaware
  • María Teresa Rodríguez(Author)
    National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity (CONABIO)
  • Muhammad Kamal(Author)
    The University of Queensland
  • Nathan Thomas(Author)
  • Emma Asbridge(Author)
    University of New South Wales
  • Claudia Kuenzer(Author)
    German Remote Sensing Data Center
    German Aerospace Center (DLR)
Type Chapter
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMangrove Ecosystems: A Global Biogeographic Perspective
Subtitle of host publicationStructure, Function and Services
EditorsVictor H. Rivera-Monroy, Shing Yip Lee, Erik Kristensen, Robert R. Twilley
PublisherSpringer Nature
Pages87-112
ISBN (Electronic)9783319622064
ISBN (Print)9783319622040
DOI
Publication statusPublished - 06 Dec 2017
Permanent link
View graph of relations
Citation formats

Abstract

Over the past few decades, a diverse range of remote sensing data have been acquired over mangrove areas in different modes and with varying spatial resolutions and temporal frequencies, with these used to advance our understanding of mangrove ecosystems and their response to natural and human-induced change. Detailed information on the floristic composition, structure, biomass and growth stage of mangroves and changes in these attributes over time and at different scales of observation has been obtained and the knowledge gained has been to better inform on, for example, carbon dynamics, floral and faunal diversity, connectivity with adjacent environments, and responses to changing hydrological regimes and climate. Significant opportunities also exist for more effective use of these data for actively managing mangroves and the services they provide and ensuring that they are not overexploited and their integrity within the coastal environment is maintained. The benefits of including these data in mangrove characterization, mapping and monitoring programs are demonstrated using case studies from a wide range of locations, including in Australia, Southeast Asia and central America, and instruments such as radar, lidar and optical sensors. Local to global efforts aimed at monitoring mangrove dynamics using remote sensing data are also increasing, with these leading to more informed decisions in relation to conservation, management and sustainable use.

The authors would like to acknowledge Jorg Hacker of Airborne Research Australia (ARA) for providing LIDAR data for the Gulf of Carpentaria and the Japanese Space Exploration Agency (JAXA) for access to Japanese L-band SAR data.