Short-term impacts of enhanced UV-B radiation on photo-assimilate allocation and metabolism: a possible interpretation for time-dependent inhibition of growth

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Short-term impacts of enhanced UV-B radiation on photo-assimilate allocation and metabolism: a possible interpretation for time-dependent inhibition of growth. / Gwynn-Jones, Dylan.

In: Plant Ecology, Vol. 154, No. 1-2, 2001, p. 1-2.

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@article{8d4a6d5a775d48fea05d2d2980df623e,
title = "Short-term impacts of enhanced UV-B radiation on photo-assimilate allocation and metabolism: a possible interpretation for time-dependent inhibition of growth",
abstract = "To test the hypothesis that plant source-sink relations are important in determining response to UV-B radiation, a short-term (45 d) field experiment was conducted at Abisko Scientific Research Station, Abisko, Sweden (68° N). Tillers of the grass Calamagrostis purpurea were grown outdoors at levels of UV-B radiation representing 25% ozone depletion. Growth, respiration, photo-assimilate allocation and UV-B protective compounds were subsequently measured. There were no significant effects of enhanced UV-B on total plant dry weight, leaf area, Shoot: Root ratio, leaf weight ratio, leaf area ratio, specific leaf area, tiller number per plant or blade thickness of this species. However, the amount of UV-B absorbing compounds and respiration rates were significantly increased in young and mature leaves. Increases in leaf respiration were accompanied by alterations in plant carbohydrate allocation at enhanced UV-B. The amount of soluble root carbohydrates was reduced following UV-B exposure. Enhanced UV-B also caused increases in the soluble sugar: starch ratio of young leaves, the stem and total aboveground biomass. The importance of source-sink relations and constitutive versus induced defense are discussed in relation to UV-B response.",
author = "Dylan Gwynn-Jones",
note = "Gwynn-Jones, D. (2001). Short-term impacts of enhanced UV-B radiation on photo-assimilate allocation and metabolism: a possible interpretation for time-dependent inhibition of growth.  Plant Ecology, 154, (1-2). Sponsorship: European Community (Contract EV5V-CT910032).",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1023/A:1012963021074",
language = "English",
volume = "154",
pages = "1--2",
journal = "Plant Ecology",
issn = "1385-0237",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
number = "1-2",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Short-term impacts of enhanced UV-B radiation on photo-assimilate allocation and metabolism: a possible interpretation for time-dependent inhibition of growth

AU - Gwynn-Jones, Dylan

N1 - Gwynn-Jones, D. (2001). Short-term impacts of enhanced UV-B radiation on photo-assimilate allocation and metabolism: a possible interpretation for time-dependent inhibition of growth.  Plant Ecology, 154, (1-2). Sponsorship: European Community (Contract EV5V-CT910032).

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - To test the hypothesis that plant source-sink relations are important in determining response to UV-B radiation, a short-term (45 d) field experiment was conducted at Abisko Scientific Research Station, Abisko, Sweden (68° N). Tillers of the grass Calamagrostis purpurea were grown outdoors at levels of UV-B radiation representing 25% ozone depletion. Growth, respiration, photo-assimilate allocation and UV-B protective compounds were subsequently measured. There were no significant effects of enhanced UV-B on total plant dry weight, leaf area, Shoot: Root ratio, leaf weight ratio, leaf area ratio, specific leaf area, tiller number per plant or blade thickness of this species. However, the amount of UV-B absorbing compounds and respiration rates were significantly increased in young and mature leaves. Increases in leaf respiration were accompanied by alterations in plant carbohydrate allocation at enhanced UV-B. The amount of soluble root carbohydrates was reduced following UV-B exposure. Enhanced UV-B also caused increases in the soluble sugar: starch ratio of young leaves, the stem and total aboveground biomass. The importance of source-sink relations and constitutive versus induced defense are discussed in relation to UV-B response.

AB - To test the hypothesis that plant source-sink relations are important in determining response to UV-B radiation, a short-term (45 d) field experiment was conducted at Abisko Scientific Research Station, Abisko, Sweden (68° N). Tillers of the grass Calamagrostis purpurea were grown outdoors at levels of UV-B radiation representing 25% ozone depletion. Growth, respiration, photo-assimilate allocation and UV-B protective compounds were subsequently measured. There were no significant effects of enhanced UV-B on total plant dry weight, leaf area, Shoot: Root ratio, leaf weight ratio, leaf area ratio, specific leaf area, tiller number per plant or blade thickness of this species. However, the amount of UV-B absorbing compounds and respiration rates were significantly increased in young and mature leaves. Increases in leaf respiration were accompanied by alterations in plant carbohydrate allocation at enhanced UV-B. The amount of soluble root carbohydrates was reduced following UV-B exposure. Enhanced UV-B also caused increases in the soluble sugar: starch ratio of young leaves, the stem and total aboveground biomass. The importance of source-sink relations and constitutive versus induced defense are discussed in relation to UV-B response.

U2 - 10.1023/A:1012963021074

DO - 10.1023/A:1012963021074

M3 - Article

VL - 154

SP - 1

EP - 2

JO - Plant Ecology

JF - Plant Ecology

SN - 1385-0237

IS - 1-2

ER -

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