Fluid dynamics experiments with a passive robot in regular turbulence

Authors Organisations
  • Gert Toming(Author)
    Tallinn University of Technology
  • Taavi Salumae(Author)
    Tallinn University of Technology
  • Asko Ristolainen(Author)
    Tallinn University of Technology
  • Francesco Visentin(Author)
    University of Verona
  • Otar Akanyeti(Author)
    University of Verona
  • Maarja Kruusmaa(Author)
    Tallinn University of Technology
Type Conference Proceeding (Non-Journal item)
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, ROBIO 2012 - Conference Digest
Pages532-537
Number of pages6
DOI
Publication statusPublished - 04 Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, ROBIO 2012 - Guangzhou, China
Duration: 11 Dec 201214 Dec 2012

Publication series

Name2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, ROBIO 2012 - Conference Digest

Conference

Conference2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, ROBIO 2012
Country/TerritoryChina
CityGuangzhou
Period11 Dec 201214 Dec 2012
Links
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Abstract

This paper presents force measurements of a passive fish robot in a regularly turbulent flow. We placed the robot into a controlled hydrodynamic environment, in running water behind a cylinder which created alternately shed vortices (von Kármán vortex street). We monitored the flow field using digital particle image velocimetry and recorded the force measurements using a force plate. The measurements taken at different locations in the turbulent flow show that the lateral force (perpendicular to the flow stream) experienced by the robot increased significantly in the turbulent flow. On the other hand the drag (force along the flow stream) was reduced up to 42% with respect to swimming in the uniform flow. The drag reduction was mainly due to the shadowing effect of the cylinder. However robots didn't gain any advantage through their passive interaction with the vortex street. The dragposition relationship had a single minimum along both longitudinal and lateral axis highlighting a favorable location for energy saving. We interpret the results as an evidence that the turbulent flows can provide rewarding opportunities to derive more energy efficient and stable behavioral strategies for underwater robots.