Calvinistic Methodism and the Reformed Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Wales

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Calvinistic Methodism and the Reformed Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Wales. / Jones, David Ceri.

Christianities in the Early Modern Celtic World. ed. / Tadhg Ó hAnnracháin; R. Armstrong. Houndmills : Springer Nature, 2014. p. 164-178.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Jones, DC 2014, Calvinistic Methodism and the Reformed Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Wales. in T Ó hAnnracháin & R Armstrong (eds), Christianities in the Early Modern Celtic World. Springer Nature, Houndmills, pp. 164-178. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137306357_12

APA

Jones, D. C. (2014). Calvinistic Methodism and the Reformed Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Wales. In T. Ó hAnnracháin, & R. Armstrong (Eds.), Christianities in the Early Modern Celtic World (pp. 164-178). Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137306357_12

Vancouver

Jones DC. Calvinistic Methodism and the Reformed Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Wales. In Ó hAnnracháin T, Armstrong R, editors, Christianities in the Early Modern Celtic World. Houndmills: Springer Nature. 2014. p. 164-178 https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137306357_12

Author

Jones, David Ceri. / Calvinistic Methodism and the Reformed Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Wales. Christianities in the Early Modern Celtic World. editor / Tadhg Ó hAnnracháin ; R. Armstrong. Houndmills : Springer Nature, 2014. pp. 164-178

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{0a3fda3397fd476ca874ca54633ff4f2,
title = "Calvinistic Methodism and the Reformed Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Wales",
abstract = "In a book of Welsh language essays, the literary critic Bobi Jones has written that Augustinian and Calvinist theological ideas provided the main highway for Welsh thought from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries and possibly even much of the twentieth century as well.1 Allowing for a measure of hyperbole in this assertion, explained to some degree perhaps by Bobi Jones{\textquoteright}s own neo-Calvinist perspective,2 the teachings of John Calvin, and Reformation thought and values more generally, have played a formative role, not only in the religious development of early modern Wales but also on many aspects of its intellectual, political and cultural life. It was an influence mediated at first through a select band of sixteenth-century Protestants, a similarly small and elitist Puritan movement in the seventeenth century, the much more populist evangelical revival which had its origins in the middle decades of the eighteenth century, and a nonconformity that, by the mid-nineteenth century, held a dominant influence over much of mainstream Welsh society.",
author = "Jones, {David Ceri}",
year = "2014",
month = jul,
day = "23",
doi = "10.1057/9781137306357_12",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781349455096",
pages = "164--178",
editor = "{{\'O} hAnnrach{\'a}in}, {Tadhg } and R. Armstrong",
booktitle = "Christianities in the Early Modern Celtic World",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
address = "Switzerland",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Calvinistic Methodism and the Reformed Tradition in Eighteenth-Century Wales

AU - Jones, David Ceri

PY - 2014/7/23

Y1 - 2014/7/23

N2 - In a book of Welsh language essays, the literary critic Bobi Jones has written that Augustinian and Calvinist theological ideas provided the main highway for Welsh thought from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries and possibly even much of the twentieth century as well.1 Allowing for a measure of hyperbole in this assertion, explained to some degree perhaps by Bobi Jones’s own neo-Calvinist perspective,2 the teachings of John Calvin, and Reformation thought and values more generally, have played a formative role, not only in the religious development of early modern Wales but also on many aspects of its intellectual, political and cultural life. It was an influence mediated at first through a select band of sixteenth-century Protestants, a similarly small and elitist Puritan movement in the seventeenth century, the much more populist evangelical revival which had its origins in the middle decades of the eighteenth century, and a nonconformity that, by the mid-nineteenth century, held a dominant influence over much of mainstream Welsh society.

AB - In a book of Welsh language essays, the literary critic Bobi Jones has written that Augustinian and Calvinist theological ideas provided the main highway for Welsh thought from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries and possibly even much of the twentieth century as well.1 Allowing for a measure of hyperbole in this assertion, explained to some degree perhaps by Bobi Jones’s own neo-Calvinist perspective,2 the teachings of John Calvin, and Reformation thought and values more generally, have played a formative role, not only in the religious development of early modern Wales but also on many aspects of its intellectual, political and cultural life. It was an influence mediated at first through a select band of sixteenth-century Protestants, a similarly small and elitist Puritan movement in the seventeenth century, the much more populist evangelical revival which had its origins in the middle decades of the eighteenth century, and a nonconformity that, by the mid-nineteenth century, held a dominant influence over much of mainstream Welsh society.

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DO - 10.1057/9781137306357_12

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781349455096

SP - 164

EP - 178

BT - Christianities in the Early Modern Celtic World

A2 - Ó hAnnracháin, Tadhg

A2 - Armstrong, R.

PB - Springer Nature

CY - Houndmills

ER -

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