Preserving, restoring and managing Colombian Biodiversity through responsible innovation

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Participants Organisations
  • Federica Di Palma (PI)The Earlham Institute
  • Iain Donnison (PI)Department of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences
  • Jacobo Arango (CoI)Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT)
  • Ian Barnes (CoI)
  • Corrado Di Maria (CoI)University of East Anglia
  • Silvia Ferrini (CoI)University of East Anglia
  • Wilfred Haerty (CoI)The Earlham Institute
  • Neil Hall (CoI)Earlham Institute, Norwich
  • Anthony J, Hall (CoI)Earlham Institute, Norwich
  • Santiago Madriñán (CoI)University of the Andes, Colombia
  • Robert K, Turner (CoI)University of East Anglia
  • Martha Vives Florez (CoI)University of the Andes, Colombia
  • Jose de Vega (Researcher)

Funding

  • Earlham Institute: £54,020.00

Funder Project Reference(s)

LED BY EARLHAM INSTIT
Effective start/end date01 Oct 201731 Dec 2021

Description

The proposal targets the country of Colombia, at a very important time in history following the peace agreement between the government and the FARC. Colombia is one of the 17 countries considered as "megadiverse" by United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Colombia's biodiversity is not only important for the country's natural heritage and the preservation of unique species in the world, it is also essential for the improvement of human welfare, social equality and economic development.

The proposal has been built on a foundation of existing research activities, with the involvement of additional stakeholders, business, government, and third sector organisations, promoting cross-disciplinary expertise to tackle three developmental challenges, and ensuring that impact extents beyond the length of the project.

Our short-term goals are to build research capacity, partnerships and knowledge, with the longer-term goals of stimulating economic and social growth around biodiversity. We have established an alliance of institutions in the UK and Colombia in order to (1) gather information on changes in distribution, diversity, and conservation status of the natural diversity of Colombia, (2) characterise and manage agricultural genetic biodiversity to make breeding and farming more efficient, and (3) assess the challenges and impacts associated with the biodiversity challenges outlined in the other two work programmes to develop key relevant policies and programmes.

In addition we will build research capability by developing researchers' skills, as well their access to research information and resources through group meetings, workshops, networking events and training courses, that will be delivered in collaboration with Colombian partners and in alignment with the activities of the proposal. We will also improve the technological self-sufficiency of the Colombian research community by facilitating the adoption of innovative technologies. Furthermore, we will ensure we raise awareness of the challenges among the public and inform them of how our outcomes are likely to benefit them. Our proposal on Colombian Biodiversity is timely and will allow the targeted country to reach higher scientific level in the proposed activities as well as applying science to inform decision-making and business investments in sustainable agriculture. Ultimately its outcomes will contribute to a long lasting impact by promoting peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels (UN SDG 16).