Prof Peter Midmore Graduated in Economics and Agricultural Economics from Aberystwyth in 1982, and gained his PhD in Agricultural Economics six years later.

Professor of Economics

View graph of relations

Aberystwyth Business School

Postal address
Aberystwyth University
Cledwyn Building
Penglais
Aberystwyth
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Contact
Phone: 01970 622251

Additional information

Peter Midmore's research interests are in regional and agricultural economics, especially relating to natural resources and rural development. He uses a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods to support improved policy evaluation. Through the Aberystwyth Business School's Centre for Local and Regional Enterprise, projects have been funded from a number of sources, including the UK and Welsh Governments, the OECD and the EU's Framework programmes. He recently contributed to a study of the potential socio-economic impact of vaccination of cattle to protect them from bovine Tuberculosis, and led a study funded by the Federation of Small Businesses to determine the regional economic impact of the Severn Crossings toll. He was the coordinator of an EU-funded project on the impact of agricultural research in Europe completed in December 2017 (see http://www.impresa-project.eu). Current projects include a study of the dynamics of poverty and vulnerability for the PublicPolicy Institute for Wales and a Horizon 2020 project in collaboration with Wageningen University which aims to analyze, assess and improve the resilience and sustainability of farms and farming systems in the EU. He has long-standing collaborative relationships with Istituto Agronomico Mediterraneo di Bari in Italy, and with a local economic development initiative (PLANED) in Pembrokeshire. He is chairman of Llandre Heritage, a local environmental and cultural conservation charity.

Profile

Peter Midmore graduated in Economics and Agricultural Economics from Aberystwyth in 1982, and gained his PhD in Agricultural Economics six years later. He was appointed as Research Associate and then Lecturer in Agricultural Economics, and was appointed to a chair in 1998, initially in Rural Studies, and since 2001 as Professor of Economics. He is President of the UK’s Agricultural Economics Society and will serve until April 2018. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society or Arts and the Higher Education Academy, and a Member of the Institute of Welsh Affairs. He teaches microeconomics and regional economics.

*